Taking Biotin For Beard Growth

Have you ever looked at another guy’s beard and felt an annoying pang of envy strike you out of the blue? Even if you’re a man who is content with his appearance as a whole, we all have our moments of weakness where we feel like we can be better versions of ourselves. 

Try not to compare yourself to other men with genetics that differ from your own; instead, make the most of what your body can give you when it is given the nutrients necessary for healthy beard growth. Biotin has become a central figure in the world of hair loss solutions, celebrated by many for its beneficial effects on hair, skin, and keratin health. But do the positive reviews hold up when it comes to growing fuller facial hair?   

Well, as it turns out, they do. What many men may not realize is that biotin, when taken in appropriate doses, might actually be the most efficient natural ingredient for stimulating the growth of thicker beards. You don’t need to be in search of better skin or stronger nails to justify taking biotin, but you can enjoy those effects as additional bonuses. 

Though biotin is a naturally occurring vitamin easily obtained through a balanced diet, supplements that contain biotin have become commonplace among the current health market. They can certainly aid you in your beard-growing ventures, but never neglect doing your own research into what’s best suited for your personal needs. I even developed my own formula that aims to get the most satisfactory results with my Multi Collagen Plus Biotin and Vitamin D supplements.

Curious to know if biotin is right for your beard goals? Keep reading to learn more about the following:

  • Why biotin is essential for hair growth
  • How biotin can benefit your beard
  • The undesirable effects of a biotin deficiency

Biotin in a Nutshell

History’s Long Sought-After Solution to Hair Loss

Biotin was first discovered in its pure form by researchers in the 1930s and referred to as vitamin H. Its importance in organic lifeforms was determined after experimentation took place on lab mice, in which several mice were fed a diet with an additive of raw egg whites that were included in their food. By 1942 biotin’s structure was identified due to living animals requiring it as a natural part of their diet, and it was subsequently grouped into the B complex of vitamins. 

Biotin’s initial discovery nearly an entire century ago was a turning point for humanity in regards to hair health. Treatments to combat hair loss have existed for as long as medicine was a concept, with Greek physician Hippocrates even taking part in concocting his own mixtures and formulae to find a solution to baldness, none of which actually proved successful. 

From the manure and honey solution used by Ancient Egyptians, to the prominent fashion choices of wigs and hats in Western societies, people all throughout history were determined to find a feasible remedy to prevent hair loss. That’s why, once biotin was discovered and its health-boosting effects became widely known, it became a popular vitamin among individuals of various ages to help combat dreaded baldness. People even began combining biotin with other vitamins and minerals known for their positive impact on hair growth, such as collagen and vitamin D. 

Biotin has the ability to promote and strengthen the keratin found in your hair, which can also affect your facial hair and cause better beard growth. 

An Essential Vitamin

Though the biotin supplements you see in the store advertise the amazing benefits that biotin has for your hair, skin, and nail health, it is an extremely versatile vitamin that the body requires in order to perform numerous important functions. Biotin is needed to perform vital metabolic functions within the body, such as catalyzing the synthesis of fatty acids and generating glucose from non-sugar carbon substrates (gluconeogenesis). It is also necessary for optimal cell growth, maintaining a steady blood sugar level, and the transference of carbon dioxide. 

The relationship between biotin and symbiotic bacteria inside the intestines of humans works to prevent a biotin deficiency, since these bacteria produce small amounts of biotin. Outside of the minimal amount of biotin synthesized by the bacteria in your intestines, the remaining amount of biotin your body needs is obtained through your diet. Luckily, biotin is naturally occurring in many different foods and is easy to incorporate into your diet.

Some biotin-rich food include the following:

  • Bananas
  • Dairy products
  • Egg yolks
  • Nuts and oats
  • Avocados
  • Hearty greens (like broccoli and kale)
  • Pork
  • Legumes

Biotin and Your Beard

Unlocking the Secret To a Better Beard

There are an abundance of biotin advertisements that target women who desire thicker, healthier hair, but I assure you it goes both ways. Biotin does not care about your gender – it will work in much the same way for men and women alike, so don’t shy away from biotin simply because you fear it to be too “feminine.” 

Biotin aids in the production of keratin, which is a protein that can be found in your hair and nails, and is responsible for making hair follicles grow at a faster rate. Since biotin promotes your body’s natural production of keratin, it stands to reason biotin encourages beard growth as well, though research pertaining to the effects of biotin on beard growth has yet to be extensively analyzed. 

What we do know, however, is that biotin works to stimulate hair growth and can have a positive impact on facial hair. By ingesting biotin, you are strengthening the keratin contained in your hair, which makes it more resilient and less prone to breaking. This can help resolve issues of thinning hair, making it thicker, fuller, and more healthy overall.

A biotin deficiency slows down hair growth and weakens the follicles, causing thin, brittle hair that easily breaks off. In terms of facial hair, this means that a biotin deficiency can cause your beard to appear patchy and inhibit the growth of new hair. 

Someone holding a gel pill between their fingers
Adding biotin supplements to your wellness routine is a great way to boost your health, but you should always take supplements because you have the desire to, and not as a response to the desires of someone else.

How Much Biotin Do You Need?

There is no federally regulated official dosage for biotin. You’ll likely see various types of biotin supplements that contain anywhere from very small doses to incredibly large ones, so you can have your pick of the bunch.

However, it is important to realize that the human body only needs around 30 mcg a day, and anything that is over 100 mcg can end up doing more harm than good. Though biotin is not a toxic substance, too much biotin can have undesired side effects. Try to keep your dose at the daily requirement of 30 mcg and be sure to communicate with your doctor if you feel the need to increase your intake.   

Taking Biotin Supplements for Beard Growth

What to Expect When Taking Biotin Supplements

I’m boasting so much about biotin that you must be beyond eager to get your hands on some supplements and get the beard you’ve always dreamed of having. But before you frantically rush to the nearest supermarket with high hopes, remember that biotin is like any other supplement and results are never going to be instantaneous. 

If you’re expecting to pop a couple capsules and wake up the next morning sprouting a dense mane from your chin, you better prepare yourself for disappointment. They’re not magic pills, and they aren’t going to work the same for everybody. It may take months of taking biotin supplements to see any kind of results in regards to hair growth, which may deter people from continuing doses.

Results are generally visible about three to six months after beginning biotin supplements. That may seem like an eternity while you eagerly assess every new strand of hair on your face each morning, but everyone experiences change at different speeds. 

There are many factors that contribute to your ability to grow facial hair, and genetics play a major role. Supplements can help enhance the features that already exist within yourself, but they are not going to alter the type of facial hair someone is predispositioned to. 

Potential Side Effects 

Though biotin is perfectly safe and required for your body to perform its many functions, you should be aware that ingesting too much biotin can lead to some possible drawbacks. If you go over the recommended dosage you increase the likelihood of developing other health issues, and you might even end up with results that are the opposite of what you wanted from taking biotin supplements in the first place. 

Too much biotin may cause any of the following to occur:

  • Acne
  • Skin rash
  • Digestive issues 
  • Kidney problems 
  • Allergic reaction
  • Skewed lab results

Always communicate with your doctor about any supplements you want to add to your diet. Biotin may interact with other prescribed medications, which can lower their effectiveness and cause issues to your health. It’s better to be safe than sorry, even with something as safe as biotin.

Making the Right Choice

Do What’s Best For Your Health

With the overwhelming amount of biotin supplements available to you in the health section of your local grocery store, you have to do some minimal research to know which one is the right fit for you. Don’t make a last minute decision on the assumption of “more is better” when it comes to biotin – high doses can cause a range of health problems. 

A lot of biotin supplements boast high dosages for near-instantaneous results of thick, flowing hair and skin that practically glows in the sunlight, going even as high as 10,000mcg per capsule. Since the daily recommended dose of biotin is closer to 30mcg, you might want to think twice before choosing the obscenely high option. 

My new Multi Collagen Plus Biotin and Vitamin D supplements offer a far more appropriate dose of 100mcg and still achieve results that will boost your confidence and your hair growth.  Intended for the individual who wishes to see quick, natural changes in their appearance, my vitamins combine the effects of collagen, biotin, and vitamin D to boost the health of your skin, hair, nails, and joints. 

Remember, your health journey should be a holistic one that doesn’t lose its impact when you observe the results of others. Every person is a different individual with aspirations that aren’t going to align exactly with yours, so it is impossible to compare your progress and accomplishments with those around you. 

At the end of the day, you need to be concerned with your health above all others, because you’re making this effort for yourself and no one else. Feel inspired with all of the positive feedback you hear and drown out anything that doesn’t have to do with you reaching your goals. 

You should consult a licensed health care professional before starting any supplement, dietary, or exercise program, especially if you are pregnant or have any pre-existing injuries or medical conditions.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases.

@dremilnutrition